Atlanta Real Estate Law

The main idea behind the formulation of Real Estate Laws is the protection of public interest. This license law pertaining to real estate in Atlanta has been in place for a very long time, since 1926 to be exact. Some changes were effected in the law in 1999. The headquarters of the Georgia Real Estate Commission is in Atlanta.

For either buying or selling a house in Atlanta you will need to use the services of a broker. The broker’s commission is generally paid by the seller.

People do not step into the property market with ready cash in hand. Most home buyers need to borrow money in order to purchase their home. Even people who have enough assets to liquidise and finance a new home go in for financing deals as in the long run the returns on the money are better as real estate appreciates pretty fast. At times tax relief is a main reason for going in for a mortgage. The home loan taken by property buyers is called a “mortgage.” Generally, a mortgage is a loan of money to the home owner secured by a “lien” on the real estate. The law provides for issues like non payment of mortgages, foreclosure and the like.

Rules regarding the fine details of mortgage deals are laid down specifically by law. There are basically three types of mortgage options. A fixed rate mortgage carries an interest rate that remains fixed throughout the term of the mortgage. The second option is the adjustable rate mortgage that carries an initial fixed rate of interest. And after a fixed time interval the rate of interest reflects market trends. The third option is a balloon mortgage under which after a fixed monthly payment for a fixed time period the balance becomes payable all at once. Generally those who do not qualify for the first two types of mortgages opt for this one. And when the fixed time period is over they go in for refinancing the mortgage. Another option available is referred to as the home equity loan. Under this a floating rate of interest over a period of time is applicable.

Direct lenders such as banks and other financial institutions offer loans. The applicant’s ability to pay back the loan is assessed and once all formalities are completed the loan comes through. Getting the best interest rates will however need some homework as rates vary from bank to bank and region to region. A good place to get mortgage related information would be [http://www.iown.com].

Are Atlanta Home Mortgage Lenders And Brokers Being Squeezed Out Of The Mortgage Market?

Mortgage guidelines and rules are changing daily because of the current mortgage crisis. Foreclosures are up, and the Atlanta market is eighth in over-all foreclosures nationwide. Larger investors are turning down four times as many loans and have dropped more than half of the programs as they less than a year ago. This isn’t a very optimistic picture for those smaller lenders and brokers that are trying to keep their heads above water.

Atlanta mortgage brokers operate as a virtual lending arm for larger banks like Countrywide, Chase and Bank of America. Basically they capture business that the larger banks retail divisions miss or can’t handle. Larger banks, by in large depend on loan originators with less experience to process loans. The loans are then processed through their financial assembly line to obtain a closed loan. Each person within the chain has a specific job but rarely has time to change programs, rates and terms in the middle of the process that would upset the assembly line.

For the most part, this is where smaller lenders and brokers carved out their living. These mortgage companies have the time, personnel and experience to “shift gears” on more difficult loans. Now that a large percentage of the “difficult” loans are non-existent in today’s market the rules are changing. Larger banks are beginning to give emphasis to their retail departments while tightening the rules for the broker relationships they have established. Many smaller broker shops are feeling that this is the larger investors’ way of closing down their wholesale divisions.

However, some Atlanta mortgage brokers are seeing the glass “half full” during this time of crisis for most people in the lending industry. Jeff Stephens, president of Global Lending in Atlanta Georgia sure seems to think so. “Before the mortgage boom brokers provided a real service for a certain segment of the market. Our services are needed now more than ever. There are a dozen different investors with a hundred different products each having 30 or more pages of guidelines. A professional broker will know which programs will save the borrowers the most time and money”.

He continued, “the very fact that banks are turning down 4 out of 15 loans makes our services almost indispensable. More than half of the loans that are turned down by one investor may very well work with another investor. Applying to the wrong lender, or having your application presented without all of the facts can cost you thousands in today’s changing market.”

-Hundreds of small brokers and lenders have thrown in the towel as a result of the looming mortgage crisis and many more are expected to follow. The number of smaller broker shops that are still in business are roughly the same amount there was before the refi-boom. Some are seeing this as a market correction, in effect the hangover after the party. Still others are taking a more legislative view point by asking elected officials to reenact GAFLA (Georgia Fair Lending Act) laws that were passed by Governor Roy Barnes during the middle of the boom.

The editors of Lendfast.com believe that this is a market correction and further legislation will only slow down or halt the recovery process. Historically, when law makers dismiss foreclosure remedies and raise lending liabilities lenders simply stop lending their money. During the “hey-day” of GAFLA we saw a mass exodus of lenders from the state of Georgia based on their inability to sell their loans with Georgia laws attached to them. Adding this stipulation to lenders in this market will be disastrous to our economy and bring lending to a screeching halt for lenders small and large. If we let the “wound” heal, the “band-aid” can be removed in a year or two and you can bet lenders will be more conscious of their lending practices.

Atlanta Mortgage Refinancing

Mortgage lenders also provide refinancing to borrowers. The Atlanta Mortgage Group Inc. offers “No Cost” Refinancing, in which the borrower is not required to pay closing costs. Generally there will be fees associated with obtaining a mortgage relating to relating to loan origination, appraisal, preparation of credit report, attorney fee, title fees etc. The lender or the borrower depending on the terms and conditions of the mortgage must pay these costs.

In the case of “No Cost” refinancing, the lender will agree to pay the fee. In turn he will charge the borrower a higher rate of interest for the entire life of the loan. The excess interest may range from 0.5 to 1 percent depending on the size of the loan. However it makes more sense to pay the normal closing costs of the loan and pay lower interest rate.

Another refinancing company in Atlanta, Garrett Mortgage Inc., also offers refinancing of home mortgages in and around Georgia. It also offers suggestions to borrowers about the feasibility of opting for refinance at some time to the borrower.

Home mortgage refinancing reduces the current monthly payments of the borrower, results in paying off the mortgage faster and also reduces interest risk by switching over from the adjustable interest rate loan to the fixed interest rate loan. There is no need to go for private mortgage insurance in the presence of refinancing option. One can save substantially with a mortgage refinance. A mortgage refinance calculator, which determines the monthly payments, the interest savings and the number of months for reaching break-even point on the closing costs will help the borrower in deciding whether it is useful to refinance at a lower interest rate.